Photographers

Bolette Berg and Marie Høeg

They took portraits and views of Horten and surroundings and lived lived off the revenue from the sale. Perhaps the two photographers understood by the very process of portraiture how important it is to stage oneself and to what a large degree that contributes to how we are perceived...

Inga Breder

As a young lady she lived with her parents and was an active amateur photographer. In 1921 she was a member of the photography club Oslo Kamera Klubb (OKK). She was highly active in the club’s competitions and a respected jury member. Breder photographed landscapes, urban imagery, portraits, interiors, and still lifes...

Jacob August Riis

After leading an itinerant existence for many years, Jacob Riis began working as a journalist in New York. As a crime reporter, he witnessed the growth of the slums. Riis used his camera as a weapon in an over twenty-five-year-long struggle to achieve concrete goals...

Elisabeth Meyer

Elisabeth Meyer was one of Norway’s first photojournalists and went on several important journeys to Persia, India, and Mexico both before and after the Second World War. She was also a journalist in her own right. She bequeathed her cameras, her library, and some money to Oslo Kamera Klubb.

Julia Margaret Cameron

Julia Margaret Cameron photographed many of the prominent figures of her age, among them Sir John Herschel, Robert Browning, and Charles Darwin. Cameron was a member of the Photographic Society of Great Britain, held several solo exhibitions...

Lewis Wickes Hine

Lewis Hine grew up in Oshkosh, Wisconsin. As a young man he had to provide for himself, and his employment at a furniture factory provided Hine with first-hand knowledge of the harsh realities industrial workers faced. From 1904 and until his death, he documented a number of communities both in the United States and in Europe...

Henry B. Goodwin

Heinrich Karl Hugo Bürgel studied philology at universities in Munich, Copenhagen, and Leipzig before he obtained his PhD in 1903. In 1905 he moved to Sweden. Two years later he became a Swedish citizen, and in 1915 he changed his name to Henry B. Goodwin...

Rudolf Dührkoop

Rudolf Dührkoop was originally a railway employee and a keen amateur photographer, but transitioned to become a professional photographer. Inspired by the era’s painterly ambitions and the technique of carbon print, he gradually managed to make a name for himself as an in-demand portrait photographer with his own studio.

David Octavius Hill & Robert Adamson

David Octavius Hill and Robert Adamson was collaborating for many years with Adamson taking photographs with artistic input from Hill. They worked together in Adamson’s studio Rock House in Edinburgh, and by 1847 they had made over 3,000 negatives of people, buildings, and landscapes...

Marcus Selmer

Marcus Selmer was a central figure in Norwegian photography from the 1850s until his death in 1900. His international orientation and contacts made him an important communicator of international currents for the Norwegian photographic environment.